WWW Wednesday: December 2, 2015

Welcome to WWW Wednesday! This meme was formerly hosted by MizB at Should be Reading but is now hosted by Sam @ Taking on a World of Words.

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The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

So here we go…


Currently reading:

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Right now I’m reading Dead Ringer.

I’ve still got Kim Holden’s All of It and S.C. Stephen’s Thoughtful on hold I plan on finishing those two at some point.


Recently finished:

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This past week has been a YA reading week for me. I started off by reading Like It Never Happened. I was very lucky and won a copy this summer. I feel very guilty for not having read it yet. Somehow it got put in a drawer and forgotten about. Shame on me! You can read today’s review here.

My library request of Six of Crows came in last week. I’ve been seeing nothing but positive reviews of it and was curious to read it. I’ll be posting my review for it this Thursday.

I also read a NA holiday romance called More Than Once. I should have a review up for it Friday.


Reading Next:

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I was super lucky and won Sugar Skulls in a Goodreads Giveaway. It just came in the mail this past weekend.

I also have Jesse’s Girl to read. It’s a buddy read I’m doing with my GR friends. I love the title (“I wish that I had Jesse’s girl…”) and it sounds so cute!

I also have all of the books I got from the library to read!


What are you reading next?

Review: Like It Never Happened by Emily Adrian

23281823 Like It Never Happened

Author: Emily Adrian

Publication Date: June 2, 2015

Publisher: Dial Books

Genre: YA Contemporary

Synopsis from Goodreads:

Stereotypes, sexuality, and destructive rumors collide in this smart YA novel for fans of Sara Zarr’s Story of a Girl, Siobhan Vivian’s The List, and E. Lockhart’s The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks.

When Rebecca Rivers lands the lead in her school’s production of The Crucible, she gets to change roles in real life, too. She casts off her old reputation, grows close with her four rowdy cast-mates, and kisses the extremely handsome Charlie Lamb onstage. Even Mr. McFadden, the play’s critical director, can find no fault with Rebecca.

Though “The Essential Five” vow never to date each other, Rebecca can’t help her feelings for Charlie, leaving her both conflicted and lovestruck. But the on and off-stage drama of the cast is eclipsed by a life-altering accusation that threatens to destroy everything…even if some of it is just make believe.


 Rating: 3.5/5 Stars


Like It Never Happened is one of those tough books to review. It was a fun book to read that drew me in quickly and kept my interested, but were just some things that I didn’t like.

I’ll start with what I liked. Emily Adrian’s writing was really good. I liked how she set up the story in the present while giving us looks at the past. The story alternated back and forth seamlessly and it kept the pace moving. I liked getting the pieces of the whole story a little at a time.

I also really liked the characters. The “Essiential Five” seemed like such a fun group. I loved discovering who each character truly was outside of the group. My favorite character from the group was Lianne. She was the most supportive of everyone and seemed to have it together.

The drama aspect of the story was very cool. I don’t think I’ve read a book about high school drama club before. It was new and original. I also liked the summer camp setting.

As for the things I didn’t like…I didn’t like Rebecca’s relationship/friendship with her drama director. I know teenagers have crushes on their teachers all the time. When it seems like the attraction might go both ways it creeps me out.

Another thing I thought was a little ridiculous was the slut-shaming of Rebecca’s character. The reason behind it seemed a little silly to me. She would have been made fun of at my school but not slut-shamed. And that was a long time ago.

The last thing I didn’t like was the amount of cigarette smoking in this book. I know I’m getting old, but it bothered me. I felt like it glorified cigarettes. Which is weird because the alcohol in the story didn’t bug me.

Like It Never Happened was an enjoyable book to read even if I didn’t love everything about it. I loved the writing and I’m looking forward to seeing what Emily Adrian will write next.

 

Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten 2016 Debuts Novels We Are Looking Forward To

Top Ten Tuesday is an original weekly feature created by The Broke and the Bookish. This week’s theme is Top Ten 2016 Debuts Novels We Are Looking Forward To.

Honestly, I had to Google 2016 debut authors. I haven’t been paying attention to who the new up and comers are, so I just picked books from new authors that sounded interesting to me. All book descriptions are courtesy of Goodreads.


248857691. All We Left Behind by Ingrid Sundberg

For fans of Simone Elkeles and Courtney Summers, this haunting debut novel is about two teenagers battling their inner demons as they fall in love for the first time.

When Marion Taylor, the shy bookworm, meets sexy soccer captain Kurt Medford at a party, what seems like a sure thing quickly turns into a total mess. One moment they’re alone in the middle of a lake, igniting sparks of electricity. The next, they’re on dry land, pretending they’ve never met. But rather than the end, that night is the beginning of something real, terrifying, and completely unforgettable for them both.

As Marion and Kurt struggle to build a relationship from the fractured pieces of their pasts, every kiss they share uncovers memories both would rather keep buried. Marion desperately wants to trust Kurt and share the one secret she’s never told anyone—but some truths aren’t meant to be spoken out loud. Kurt is also still haunted by his mother’s death, by the people he hurt, and by the mistakes he can never take back.

Explosive together and hollow apart, Marion and Kurt seem totally wrong for each other—but could they turn out to be more right than they ever thought possible?


251310782. The Distance from A to Z by Natalie Blitt

This full-length novel by debut author Natalie Blitt is a pitch-perfect blend of Stephanie Perkins and Miranda Kenneally that proves the age-old adage: opposites attract.

Seventeen-year old Abby has only one goal for her summer: to make sure she is fluent in French—well, that, and to get as far away from baseball and her Cubs-obsessed family as possible. A summer of culture and language, with no sports in sight.

That turns out to be impossible, though, because her French partner is the exact kind of boy she was hoping to avoid. Eight weeks. 120 hours of class. 80 hours of conversation practice with someone who seems to exclusively wear baseball caps and jerseys.

But Zeke in French is a different person than Zeke in English. And Abby can’t help but fall for him, hard. As Abby begins to suspect that Zeke is hiding something, she has to decide if bridging the gap between the distance between who she is and who he is, is worth the risk.


256956073.My Kind of Crazy by Robin Ruel

Despite the best of intentions, seventeen-year old, wisecracking Hank Kirby can’t quite seem to catch a break. It’s not that he means to screw things up all the time, it just happens. A lot. Case in point: his attempt to ask out the girl he likes literally goes up in flames when he spells “Prom” in sparklers on her lawn…and nearly burns down her house.

As if that wasn’t bad enough, Peyton Breedlove, a brooding loner and budding pyromaniac, witnesses the whole thing. Much to Hank’s dismay, Peyton takes an interest in him—and his “work.” The two are thrust into an unusual friendship, but their boundaries are tested when Hank learns that Peyton is hiding some dark secrets, secrets that may change everything he thought he knew about Peyton.


245291234. This is Where It Ends by Marieke Nijkamp

10:00 a.m.
The principal of Opportunity, Alabama’s high school finishes her speech, welcoming the entire student body to a new semester and encouraging them to excel and achieve.

10:02 a.m.
The students get up to leave the auditorium for their next class.

10:03
The auditorium doors won’t open.

10:05
Someone starts shooting.

Told over the span of 54 harrowing minutes from four different perspectives, terror reigns as one student’s calculated revenge turns into the ultimate game of survival.


257085875. The Leaving Season by Cat Jordan

Middie Daniels calls it the Leaving Season: the time of year when everyone graduates high school, packs up their brand-new suitcases, and leaves home for the first time.

This year Middie’s boyfriend Nate is the one leaving. Nate, who’s so perfect that she can barely believe it. Nate, who makes her better than she is on her own. Nate, who’s promised to come back once he’s finished his gap year volunteering in Central America. And when he does, it’ll be time for Middie to leave, too. With him.

But when a tragedy strikes, Middie’s whole world is set spinning. No one seems to understand just how lost she is… except for Nate’s slacker best friend Lee. Middie and Lee have never gotten along. But with the ground ripped out from under her, Middie is finding that up is down—and that Lee Ryan might be just what she needs to find her footing once more.

Cat Jordan’s heartbreaking story proves that no matter the season, no matter the obstacles, love can help you find yourself in the most unexpected of places.


258141926. Tuesday Nights in the 1980 by Molly Prentiss

An intoxicating and transcendent debut novel that follows a critic, an artist, and their shared muse as they find their way—and ultimately collide—amid the ever-evolving New York City art scene of the 1980s.

Welcome to SoHo at the onset of the eighties: a gritty, quickly gentrifying playground for artists and writers looking to make it in the big city. Among them: James Bennett, a synesthetic art critic for the New York Timeswhose unlikely condition enables him to describe art in profound, magical ways, and Raul Engales, an exiled Argentinian painter running from his past and the Dirty War that has enveloped his country. As the two men ascend in the downtown arts scene, dual tragedies strike, and each is faced with a loss that acutely affects his relationship to life and to art.

It is not until they are inadvertently brought together by Lucy Olliason—a small town beauty and Raul’s muse—and a young orphan boy sent mysteriously from Buenos Aires that James and Raul are able to rediscover some semblance of what they’ve lost.

As inventive as Jennifer Egan’s A Visit from the Goon Squad and as sweeping as Meg Wolitzer’s The Interestings, Tuesday Nights in 1980boldly renders a complex moment when the meaning and nature of art is being all but upended, and New York City as a whole is reinventing itself. In risk-taking prose that is as powerful as it is playful, Molly Prentiss deftly explores the need for beauty, community, creation, and love in an ever-changing urban landscape.


240010987. Only Love Can Break Your Heart by Ed Tarkington

“Love can make people do terrible things.”

Welcome to Spencerville, Virginia, 1977. Eight-year-old Rocky worships his older brother, Paul. Sixteen and full of rebel cool, Paul spends his days cruising in his Chevy Nova blasting Neil Young, cigarette dangling from his lips, arm slung around his beautiful, troubled girlfriend. Paul is happy to have his younger brother as his sidekick. Then one day, in an act of vengeance against their father, Paul picks up Rocky from school and nearly abandons him in the woods. Afterward, Paul disappears.

Seven years later, Rocky is a teenager himself. He hasn’t forgotten being abandoned by his boyhood hero, but he’s getting over it, with the help of the wealthy neighbors’ daughter, ten years his senior, who has taken him as her lover. Unbeknownst to both of them, their affair will set in motion a course of events that rains catastrophe on both their families. After a mysterious double murder brings terror and suspicion to their small town, Rocky and his family must reckon with the past and find out how much forgiveness their hearts can hold.


224537778. Hour of the Bees by Lindsey Eager

What does it mean to be fully alive? Magic blends with reality in a stunning coming-of-age novel about a girl, a grandfather, wanderlust, and reclaiming your roots.

Things are only impossible if you stop to think about them. . . .

While her friends are spending their summers having pool parties and sleepovers, twelve-year-old Carolina — Carol — is spending hers in the middle of the New Mexico desert, helping her parents move the grandfather she’s never met into a home for people with dementia. At first, Carol avoids prickly Grandpa Serge. But as the summer wears on and the heat bears down, Carol finds herself drawn to him, fascinated by the crazy stories he tells her about a healing tree, a green-glass lake, and the bees that will bring back the rain and end a hundred years of drought. As the thin line between magic and reality starts to blur, Carol must decide for herself what is possible — and what it means to be true to her roots. Readers who dream that there’s something more out there will be enchanted by this captivating novel of family, renewal, and discovering the wonder of the world.


219798329. The Girl from Everywhere by Heidi Heilig

Heidi Heilig’s debut teen fantasy sweeps from modern-day New York City to nineteenth-century Hawaii to places of myth and legend. Sixteen-year-old Nix has sailed across the globe and through centuries aboard her time-traveling father’s ship. But when he gambles with her very existence, it all may be about to end. The Girl from Everywhere, the first of two books, will dazzle readers of Sabaa Tahir, Rae Carson, and Rachel Hartman.

Nix’s life began in Honolulu in 1868. Since then she has traveled to mythic Scandinavia, a land from the tales of One Thousand and One Nights, modern-day New York City, and many more places both real and imagined. As long as he has a map, Nix’s father can sail his ship, The Temptation, to any place, any time. But now he’s uncovered the one map he’s always sought—1868 Honolulu, before Nix’s mother died in childbirth. Nix’s life—her entire existence—is at stake. No one knows what will happen if her father changes the past. It could erase Nix’s future, her dreams, her adventures . . . her connection with the charming Persian thief, Kash, who’s been part of their crew for two years. If Nix helps her father reunite with the love of his life, it will cost her her own.

In The Girl from Everywhere, Heidi Heilig blends fantasy, history, and a modern sensibility with witty, fast-paced dialogue, breathless adventure, and enchanting romance.


2502828510. The Square Root of Summer by Harriet Rueter Hapgood

The novel follows 17-year-old physics prodigy Gottie Oppenheimer as she navigates a summer of grief and rips in the space-time continuum, all while trying to reconcile heartbreak.

 


Are any of these debuts on your to read list for 2016? Do you have any debut suggestions for me?